Veronica With Four Eyes

How Do People With Vision Impairments… Participate in Easter Egg Hunts?

When I was younger, I had no idea that I had low vision, or even eyesight that wasn’t normal.  I assumed that everyone saw two of everything, the world was blurry, and small items were difficult to see. This is a common mindset for children, as I mention in my “Dear Elementary School Teacher” post here.  I assumed Easter egg hunts were very difficult for everyone and not just me.  I never attended any special events for kids with low vision, because I was not taken on as a case with the Virginia Department of the Blind and Visually Impaired until I was fourteen years old. In fact, I didn’t learn that there were beeping Easter egg hunts for kids with low vision until I was a junior in high school.  Here are some of the ways I participated in Easter egg hunts when I was younger, how to make Easter egg hunts accessible, and including kids with low vision, blindness, and other vision impairments in Easter festivities.

See where everyone else runs

I’d sit at the end of the start line with the rest of the kids, and then watch them fan out.  I then would walk out and see where the most kids were, and just sit down and start finding eggs in the grass.  After that, I would just follow the same group of kids from section to section and find a handful of eggs. I didn’t want to go all out all alone and risk not being able to find my way back.

Have a partner

I would request to be partnered up with a friend or my brother, and they would help me find eggs.  Since all of my friends and brother had near-perfect vision, the partnership worked very well.  This also helped me avoid not slipping and falling on eggs that I might not have noticed, and it was a great bonding activity too.  No one seemed to care that I was working with someone else- I never had someone tell me that it was unfair I got a partner or anything similar. Learn more about being a human guide here.

Use your cane

I have attended more Easter egg hunts in college than I ever imagined I would.  Since I started using a blindness cane when I began college (read more about my love for my blindness cane here), I found myself using the cane to help me search for eggs in the grass.  This helped tremendously, and I found myself getting more eggs than before, though you still won’t see me finding large amounts of eggs.

Bright colored eggs

It’s a lot easier to find eggs that are bright neon colors than it is to find the more washed out pastel eggs.  One of my friends told me that their family used to put dots at the top of eggs with safety/fluorescent tape to help them find the eggs easier, without it being too easy to find the eggs. Another good idea is adding tactile materials- learn how to create tactile materials with everyday objects here.

 Attend special Easter eggs hunts for kids with low vision

If available in your area, the beeping Easter eggs are an activity that allow everyone to be at a level playing field.   In addition, it’s a great way to meet other kids who have low vision and practice with locating objects.  Contact your local department for the blind/visually impaired or other low vision/blindness organization such as the NFB.

Worst case, if you only find a couple of eggs, there is almost always candy at the end of the activity that no one has to go search for in the grass, and getting candy on clearance after Easter is also a lot of fun.

Have a Happy Easter!
Making easter egg hunts accessible to the blind and visually impaired



1 thought on “How Do People With Vision Impairments… Participate in Easter Egg Hunts?”

  • Veronica I love the information you shared about the Easter Egg Hunts! What great ideas. Thank you for sharing:)

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